Conserving Feather River lands since 2000

Photo by Andrew Wright/Lighthawkphoto

Local roots and strategic partnerships

1

Nonprofit Status

2000

With 40 charter members and no paid staff, FRLT forms as a nonprofit land trust to conserve the most important lands and waters in the Feather River Watershed

2

First Preserve

2003

In partnership with The Nature Conservancy and Sierra Business Council, FRLT acquires the 575-acre Maddalena Property, now part of the Sierra Valley Preserve

3

Learning Landscapes

2004

With local school districts, FRLT kicks off conservation and education program to connect kids to nature that will become a national model

4

Heart K Ranch

2006

FRLT purchases the Heart K Ranch, a culturally important and biodiverse 903-acre ranch along Indian Creek in Genesee Valley

5

Northern Sierra Partnership

2007

FRLT, The Nature Conservancy, Trust for Public Land, Sierra Business Council, and Truckee-Donner Land Trust launch campaign to conserve the Northern Sierra's large landscapes

6

30,000 acres

2010

By its tenth anniversary, FRLT had helped conserve 30,000 acres of wetlands, meadows, and working family ranches rich in water and biodiversity

7

Olsen Barn Meadow

2015

With tremendous community support, FRLT purchases the 107-acre historic Olsen Barn Meadow in Chester

8

National Accreditation

2015

FRLT achieves accreditation through the national Land Trust Accreditation Commission

9

New Executive Director

2016

After 17 years of visionary conservation, founder Paul Hardy passes the leadership torch to FRLT's conservation director, Shelton Douthit

10

Sierra Valley Preserve

2016-2019

In partnership with The Nature Conservancy and Northern Sierra Partnership, the Sierra Valley Preserve expands to 2,586 acres

11

2020 Vision

2017

FRLT kicks off campaign to conserve 120,000 acres of Feather River headwaters and globally unique wetlands, meadows, and forests

12

62,000+ acres

2020

With community support and strategic partners, together we've conserved over 62,000 acres of important lands and waters

I think back to the day we first gathered, in June of 1999, to see if it would be viable to start a land trust to protect this place we love. We had a dream, a vision, and our passion. We had no staff, and almost no money. It's so gratifying to look back over what we have accomplished together.

—Bob Cobb, founding Land Trust member

When you feel very connected to the land, and you see a special place being developed, you feel that you're losing part of your Self. It's just natural and instinctual, like the immune response of a white blood cell, to want to do something about it.

—Paul Hardy, founding Executive Director

Our roots

Action driven by a deep love of place

From a 4-year old boy digging worms at what is now FRLT's Sierra Valley Preserve, to a gathering of passionate volunteers in 1999, FRLT was formed by local people whose love for the special lands and waters of the Feather River region spurred them to protect it for future generations.

Photo courtesy of Paul Hardy

We have a saying at our school—You're a mountain kid. You're a mountain kid if you've interacted with local plants and animals. You've seen them in the wild, you understand their ecology, and you've done projects to support them.
- Aletha O'Kelley
2nd grade teacher, Chester