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Feather River wildflowers and native plants

Photo by Vanessa Vasquez

Botany workshop at Mountain Meadows (Walker Lake)

About John Stebbins

John Stebbins is a botanist, a longtime member of Feather River Land Trust, and life-long lover of the Feather River region. As a botanist at California State University, Fresno for 30 years, John conducted research, managed the herbarium, and taught numerous botany courses.

Learn more about John

John has been interested in the Feather River region ever since he first rode the California Zephyr through the Canyon as a very young child and also visited numerous areas near Lassen, Chester, and Quincy camping and fishing. He is always on the lookout for new or unique flora and enjoys describing new observations. He and his wife Elaine live in Napa and Lake Almanor, where they have a summer home.

John has performed numerous studies in the Sierra Nevada and has worked as a scientific consultant to the U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, several State and Federal public agencies and PG&E. He has long been involved with the utility sector in this region, working on the Bucks Lake Project and several components of the Feather River Project including Lake Almanor, Butt Lake, Mountain Meadows, and Rock Creek-Cresta. His special interests include many of the rare or localized plant species of the Sierra and he has authored or co-authored numerous publications and species descriptions.

He currently is working with the UC Berkeley Jepson Herbarium botanists on their successful YouTube video series on native California plants. John was the first president of the Sierra Foothill Conservancy (a land trust working between Yosemite and Sequoia) and is passionate about the success Land Trusts have made in conserving the unique biodiversity of California. John and Elaine are members of FRLT’s Land Legacy Circle.

Explore More with FRLT

We both appreciate places that are still precious, like the Feather River Country. The land trust has done a lot, especially in two of the most beautiful, untouched places—Genesee Valley and Sierra Valley.
- Marv and Norberta Schmidt
FRLT members since 2001